Addiction in the Immigrant Population

Addiction in the Immigrant Population


…and learn from this presentation The amount of immigrants in the United States has certainly increased since the beginning of the country In 2017, 44 million immigrants were living in the United States, making up 13.6 percent of the total population As immigrants stay here longer and continue to have children, their children and their children’s children–so their grandchildren– actually have a greater risk of reported alcohol abuse. So, as you see, these statistics are broken down into generation and by different nationality. There are many different kinds of risk factors that have an impact on immigrants when it comes to addiction. Culturally, symptoms can present differently. Being in a new country and not knowing where to go to To receive treatment or receive help in any way can create a larger problem than the addiction itself If an immigrant is fortunate enough to find a helpful resource, there could be barriers such as communication. Communication could be difficult due to differences in language and lack of understanding due to cultural differences. Protective factors can actually make or break an addiction There are different protective factors for different people so it just depends on the circumstance they are in, but resilience can really be a huge protective factor. If a child, or even an adult, is resilient, meaning they refuse to give in or let their situation define who they are or what they are going to be, that determination can really help them in the long-run in choosing a better life over addiction. Or being able to find help for their mental health and for their addictions as well. Parental monitoring is also a big protective factor because if a parent is monitoring their child, then that parent will know what their child is doing, what they are getting into, and will be able to address any potential dangerous factors or potential risks to their child. And, education is also very important. Keeping a child in school will give them focus, will give them determination, and will get them educated so then they can choose the right decision later on in life when their parents aren’t always around. Adult support groups can also be a protective factor. Being able to talk to people who are going through the same kind of situation they are or being able to, you know, get the support they need from a professional that runs the group is also a very big protective factor. And the last one that I have listed is religious observation. Being able to keep in touch with your spiritual and religious beliefs can also be a big help in, you know, not giving into addictions or trying to get through a really difficult time. Being able to have that background and that belief and, you know, being able to cling onto the people who also share that same belief can be really helpful. Exacerbating factors are exposure to violence, social distance, and poverty. Being an immigrant is not easy. You have to find a job, you have to find housing, and provide for yourself and for your family if your family is with you. So, a lot of immigrants do struggle with poverty. There are a lot of places in the United States where poverty is a very big issue, and, because of that, a lot of people suffer. That can be a huge factor in mental health and in addiction as well. You know when a person is in poverty, their mental health and their physical health typically decline, and because of that, a substance can be used to provide temporary relief, which then could lead to a substance abuse problem or addiction. Social distance, being away from the place you called home, for, you know, however long can be a very big deal. Not being around the people you are used to being around culturally. There is also an exposure to violence whether exposure to violence in their home country or exposure to violence here. Immigrants are facing, you know, threats from different people in the country or even, you know, ISIS, you know. They have been violent in the past and it’s a very scary factor that immigrants face.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *