Addictions and Mental Health Redesign

Addictions and Mental Health Redesign


[low organ music] Client 1: We do feel, you know,
guilt and shame, and by telling your story, you realize that
you’re not so alone, that there are other people
who share similar stories. Client 2: I feel more free
to speak out, and I feel sometimes
I do get those feelings back, so I talk to whoever I need to. Client 1: A lot of us
are really isolated, when you have
a mental health issue, or if you’re dealing
with substance abuse issues. You don’t really have anyone. Client 3: I want people to know
that they’re not alone, so I’ve always shared my story. Client 1: Our stories are unique, but they’re also
in some ways similar. So you have that empathy
for one another? Like, we’re all hurting. It doesn’t make me –
or anyone else – a bad person. You can rise above what
happened to you in the past. [slow drumbeat] Cynthia Martineau: People were
being lost in transitions, people were not able to find
the right door to get to. Paul Huras: We cover
a geographic area that goes from Brighton,
Belleville, Kingston, Brockville, and north
to Perth, Smiths Falls, and back across to Bancroft,
and down. So it’s very rural. Cynthia: Whether you live in
Belleville, Brockville, Kingston, we won’t have to go to multiple
doors to find the right door. Ed Bentley: It has been very much
a collaborative, listening to, consulting with the consumers,
the patients, the clients, and their caregivers,
throughout the whole process. Client 2: When I tell my story
and then they tell yours, then you’re like, wow, sometimes
you thought you had the bad end, and they actually had the bad end. Client 1: Listening to me
is listening from the heart. Client 4: Lack of judgment,
and openness, and to hear my story. There’s a lot of, sort of,
question and answer, how is this working,
how is it not working, which is – it’s kind of nice
to be part of a new project. Paul: They have a strong voice,
and I think now, we’re going to see it
stronger than ever. Client 4: It’s nice to know
people are listening to you, and what’s needed. Ed: They seem to feel
that they’re being heard. Their stories
are the measure of success. Paul: They gave a strong
message to us, and we listened. Cynthia: Patients told us
this is what they wanted to see. And we heard them, and we
incorporated it into our design. Paul: No one understands
any illness moreso than people
who’ve had that illness. Client 1: Who best to know
what we need, what we want. Paul: Right care.
Right time. Right place. This isn’t the end of it. We’ll want to keep improving,
so we will continue to listen. Client 1: I never give up hope. Things can change,
and they can change for the better. ♫

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *