The Friday Games Review: Brain and Puzzle Games

The Friday Games Review: Brain and Puzzle Games


DAN GALPIN: Hello. KOH KIM: Hey there. DAN GALPIN: My name’s Dan
Galpin, and this is– KOH KIM: Koh Kim. DAN GALPIN: And we’re here for
another episode of The Friday Games Review. Also producing for
us is Ian Lewis. IAN NI-LEWIS: That’s
Ian Ni-Lewis. DAN GALPIN: Sorry about that. IAN NI-LEWIS: Yeah. I had it legally changed. My wife is going to kill you. KOH KIM: That’s– she’s watching, right? DAN GALPIN: [INAUDIBLE]
you’ve heard that– IAN NI-LEWIS: My wife always
watches this show. DAN GALPIN: Exactly. IAN NI-LEWIS: So, Koh,
how about a beer. I don’t think we’re going
to give one to Dan. KOH KIM: I always want a beer. I was just in Germany
last week. IAN NI-LEWIS: Nice. KOH KIM: Let’s continue. DAN GALPIN: Is how
you got tan? You know, usually, that’s
not supposed to happen. KOH KIM: Actually, it was
very warm in Germany. IAN NI-LEWIS: Today’s
beer is the Widmer Brothers Imperial Stout– Raspberry Imperial Stout. We’ve been on kind of a Widmer
brothers kick here because we used to think of them as
the bland, corporate– like, Samuel Adams alike. And lately, they’ve been
doing some really cool experimental beers. So we’re having the Raspberry
Russian Imperial Stout It’s a really strong beer. It’s got just a hint of
raspberries in it. We’ll see how these guys
can tolerate it. If we have to carry one of them
out during the show, I’ll just go ahead and step in. Back to you, Dan. DAN GALPIN: Good to know you’re
here for us, Ian. So, today, I’m wearing the hard
hat, as we’re looking at brain and puzzle games. I don’t know why that really
actually makes any sense. But we’ve got an exciting
[INAUDIBLE] games for you. Some of them we really,
really love this week. I just wanted to say that. There’s some that we played
more than we might play of some of these other games. These are really addicting
puzzlers. So, warning, to anyone out
there, if you actually start playing these games, expect to
lose a lot of free time. And we also have some games
that I think have some interesting technical issues,
so we’ll try to talk through those, as well as the ones
we really, really like. And, as always, these games
were nominated by you out there in the audience on
our Moderator page. So continue to nominate,
and we will continue to look at them. KOH KIM: Yeah, for sure. Any more ways to make me pass my
commute from San Francisco to Mountain View. DAN GALPIN: Exactly. We’re here to help fill in that
gap in those long hours. So which game do we want
to look at first? So I have them in this order. Does this make sense? KOH KIM: Yeah, we can start with
all the word games first. DAN GALPIN: So we’re going to
start off with Word Push. So this is going to be a
portrait game, and once it actually loads– there we are. Excellent. We’re actually looking at a
screen that has it backwards here, so it’s a little tricky
to look at the screen. KOH KIM: It’s a little tricky. Yeah. DAN GALPIN: So Koh and I both
played this game quite a lot. And some basic things that
it gets wrong and right. So one of the things that it
gets wrong is that’s what happens when you hit the Back
key anywhere from the game. KOH KIM: Yeah, Let me just
say, that was a little annoying, because I always
accidentally hit the Back key all the time. It’s actually pretty obnoxious
how many times. And every time I try to solve
it, I’m like, wait, no, no progress saved. It’s OK. DAN GALPIN: Yeah. So it immediately loses
all progress. It immediately exits the game. And this is actually the
default behavior of an Android activity. But unfortunately, when you
have a game where you’re having multiple different
interstitials that are going on– we have a title screen,
we have a levels select screen, we have the
game itself. Just exiting doesn’t really
help, and also, losing all state could be very, very
frustrating if you’re in the middle of one of these levels. And here is an example– Word Push level. And actually, the game is
super, super clever. One thing that’s also
interesting about this game for me is that there is a
large sense of complete randomness to the game, as is
how close these blocks are to each other. So the goal in this particular
level, by the way, is to build one word using the
blue blocks. And they must be
used together– KOH KIM: Actually, it’s using
the orange blocks. And so the blue blocks
actually gives you additional mana. But to complete a level, you
actually need to make a word with the orange blocks. DAN GALPIN: I see. The point is, if you use the
blue blocks, they actually have to be used together. So that does make things
kind of tricky. So you can see I’ve played
this game a lot. KOH KIM: Clearly. It’s OK. All word games are almost the
same to us at this point. DAN GALPIN: And you can move the
other letters out of the way in different directions by
selecting top, left, right, or bottom here. And it has a nice little
animation. One of the things that’s a
little bit unclear is if you don’t watch the video, “How to
Play” intro that is built into the game, some of these things
may elude you in terms of the controls. And it still is a little bit
confusing as to what top, left, right, and bottom mean
in terms of push direction. I think it’s one of the things
that could be made a lot clearer in the game itself– perhaps a direction indicator, I
think, an arrow on the board or something showing you
the way the letters are going to move. And when we say direction
indicator, it’s really what happens when you move things
out of the way. So now we are at
top direction. KOH KIM: If he creates
a word– it’s English. It’s OK. DAN GALPIN: I know. I put “dane,” but it didn’t
like “dane.” It just [INAUDIBLE]. OK, let’s try “tan.” OK, you see
now, Top moves the letters from the top– KOH KIM: Down. DAN GALPIN: –in. KOH KIM: Right. DAN GALPIN: So that’s how
this explains here. So it explains we move
to the right here. It’s going to move letters
in from the right. KOH KIM: And then it’s going to
lift stuff from the bottom, so yeah, once you figure it
out– and a lot of it is is I actually didn’t even know that
existed until level five or six, or at least really made
full attention of that. So I think a lot of it is is
definitely, if you’re a user like me who ignores YouTube
videos on the Google Play market, you may want to make
that more clear when you start setting up the game and
introducing the game to your users. DAN GALPIN: And the tutorial is
nicely integrated into the game in the sense that the
YouTube video is a link from the main page of the game. And so the good news, at
least, if you’re– KOH KIM: Got to look at
the camera, dude. [LAUGHING] DAN GALPIN: When I’m operating
the device, I, unfortunately, have to either look at one or
the other, and I can’t operate this game in backwards mode. IAN NI-LEWIS: It’s where
it’s supposed to be. DAN GALPIN: So the problem
is also moving this is challenging. All right. So when you’re actually
operating the game, you can go back into the game by actually
hitting the Home key and going back. Ooh, that’s not fortunate. I was going to try to
demonstrate something else. The real key thing here is just
navigating within the game using the Back button. That just needs to be fixed. There’s a lot of other subtle
details that I think could be cleaned up to make the game
just that much better. The YouTube video says “YouTube
Gameplay Demo” here is actually what–
there’s a link. Which doesn’t really tell you,
by the way, you really should watch to figure out the game. But that’s Word Push. Now, I wanted to talk about,
before we get into our next word game, one of the things
that was nominated was Fifteen Puzzle X, which is the first
game done by this developer. And this is another game that’s
does a whole bunch of things that are a little
bit unfortunate. But they’re a lot of
kind of newbie Android experience things. And so what’s nice about the
game is that it has really, really wonderfully rendered
titles, for which the developer actually went and used
the fantastic open source rendering package to use. But the problem with this game
is actually a problem with save state. So I’ll show you the most
obvious problem here. So you go here. I’m going to select this tile. This tile set is only available
in four-by-four, and I can select wood, marble, or
plastic for the backgrounds. And I hit Play. And now, there’s a couple of
problems when we get into this screen here. One is that hitting the Back
key actually exits the game once again. So that’s problematic. I’m going to go back. Now, that’s a nice thing you
see– it’s actually remembered the tile that I set–
that I used. But you notice that it didn’t
actually remove these other ones again. So here’s the problem. If I go back to this screen,
I can now select six-by-six titles here. And if I actually hit Play,
you end up with that. So there are a lot of
just sort of bugs. The other problem is that this
key here looks like Restart, which would be really nice
if it does that. But actually, what it does
is it also takes you back to the main menu. Other problems this game has– I’m going to go back to the
main menu here to get to a noncorrupt-looking screen– is that this particular view
here sort of feels like an intro to the game, But, in fact,
it is all in the same activity, and because of that,
hitting the Back key [INAUDIBLE] out of both. The other thing that the game
does, though, which is pretty unusual, is if you actually hit
and go back to the home screen, and then try to go back
into the game, you’ll see that the game actually has
now changed its state. And so any exit from the game
at all, however it’s interrupted, changes
the state. So this is something that’s
definitely worth fixing. So first of all, we have an
on-screen indicator that sort of does what a Back key would
do, but actually doesn’t. And then we have kind
of immediate kill behavior on the Back key. KOH KIM: And one other thing,
at least for me, it actually took me forever to
figure out how to actually move the tiles. Because in games like this,
you’re always used to gesture-based stuff, where it’s
like, oh, I’ve got to slide the tile. Well, apparently, you can’t
really slide the tile. You actually need to
press the side– just basically push the side
and push it in the direction it moves. So it’s kind of weird, because
it took me while to figure that out. But definitely making sure
that your users at least understand how the
game is based. And if they played these games
before, make sure whatever gestures or UI that you put in,
make sure it matches what they think. DAN GALPIN: This would be a
great time to use the gesture detector that’s built into
the Android framework. You can actually detect that
kind of gesture, which would be a paging gesture. We actually call it a– I forgot the name of it. But, anyway, you can actually
detect this kind of sliding gesture, where you’d want
to slide the entire row. The other thing that I think
would really help this game out is actually a way of
demonstrating what the solution is. IAN NI-LEWIS: Hang
on, you guys. Sorry, I just need to break
in for one second. Engineer Daniel asks, what game
are you reviewing now? DAN GALPIN: That is
a good question. We are actually looking
at Fifteen Puzzle X. IAN NI-LEWIS: Hey,
wait a second. I thought we looked at this, and
it was kind of like a lot more awesome-looking. What happened? DAN GALPIN: I switched
the tiles– KOH KIM: –to plastic mode. IAN NI-LEWIS: Oh. DAN GALPIN: So we
can select wood. IAN NI-LEWIS: I liked
wood better. DAN GALPIN: Yeah, wood
looks [INAUDIBLE]– IAN NI-LEWIS: Wood looks really
cool, except for one thing, and it’s like– DAN GALPIN: The use
of Comic Sans. KOH KIM: The use
of Comic Sans. IAN NI-LEWIS: Oh, and
by the way, Koh. I’m not over to your right. I’m underneath you. KOH KIM: You’re underneath me. IAN NI-LEWIS: Hey, Koh. How’s it going, Koh? KOH KIM: Good. What’s up? All right– whatever. DAN GALPIN: Actually, I think
you’re under both of us. IAN NI-LEWIS: (SINGING)
Here’s the story– what’s up with Comic Sans? DAN GALPIN: Yeah, exactly. KOH KIM: [CHUCKLING] Comic Sans. [CHUCKLING] DAN GALPIN: I wish Comic
Sans was the largest problem this game has. IAN NI-LEWIS: You know what’s
going to happen, though? Now that we’ve mentioned Comic
Sans, a ton of people are going to email us and say, hey,
that’s not Comic Sans, that’s such and such, which
happens to be a typeface that looks just like Comic Sans. You know what? Not fooling anybody. DAN GALPIN: –so, yeah,
definitely some gestures– I also think knowing what
the solution is. It’s not clear that the numbers
actually should be going across or if they should
be going up and down and where one should be. But I think that would also be
very, very useful to actually show the solution. But that’s kind of
a minor nitpick. I think most people understand
whether it’s going to be– KOH KIM: Most people are going
to understand what a number puzzle is, at least as– DAN GALPIN: But, you know,
sometimes you do want to solve one, two, three, four,
five, six. And maybe both solutions are
actually acceptable. I’m not sure. KOH KIM: Yeah, it’s true. DAN GALPIN: I never actually got
to the point of actually solving this, but, you
know, I’m not huge fan of number puzzles. But a really great
first effort. And again, there are beautifully
rendered tiles. And, again, just some things
to think about. The biggest one, I think,
really is state. And these controls here, in
order to disable them when you’re actually going back here,
you need to actually go through and run through that
same disable logic. Because you really don’t want
users to get to this screen accidentally. KOH KIM: Yeah. It’d also be nice to see a
splash screen of what I’m playing, too, but maybe
that’s another thing. DAN GALPIN: I actually
don’t think it needs a splash screen. But I do think it’d be nice
if it were included. There’s no particular reason why
a game like this needs to go full screen. KOH KIM: Right. DAN GALPIN: And I would much
rather see the time, and my notifications, and all that kind
of thing when I’m playing a game that doesn’t need to
be completely immersive. I think this game actually is
a game that is damaged by immersivity rather than
benefiting by it. KOH KIM: I could see that. Yeah. All right. Cool. Next game? DAN GALPIN: Next game. So [INAUDIBLE] talked a
little bit about that. This game, actually, I had a lot
of compatibility problems with this device. KOH KIM: Wordruggle. [CHUCKLING] And you can probably see, it’s
kind of not wanting to turn on on his Transformer, but– DAN GALPIN: Yeah, one of the
things that’s interesting about this game is it actually
goes and immediately creates a profile account– KOH KIM: Yeah– using
my email. Thanks, everyone, for asking. DAN GALPIN: No, no–
it doesn’t– it is plugged in. KOH KIM: It’s plugged in. It’s flashing. DAN GALPIN: So this is
Wordruggle, so we should change Fifteen Puzzle X
and go to Wordruggle. So we’re going to have a really
hard time actually showing you any gameplay
here on this device. KOH KIM: I’m sorry, everyone. DAN GALPIN: It does– KOH KIM: We’re not trying
to give you seizures. DAN GALPIN: It does seem to be
an issue with the Transformer. [INAUDIBLE] this game– IAN NI-LEWIS: Try jiggling
the cable. DAN GALPIN: –on the Nexus 7. IAN NI-LEWIS: Let’s switch
to the camera. DAN GALPIN: Yeah, you can switch
to the camera so you can see what it’s actually
doing here. IAN NI-LEWIS: Producer Daniel
asks, did you jiggle it? DAN GALPIN: And the
answer is yes. KOH KIM: See, no. We’re not kidding. DAN GALPIN: Yeah, this happens
whether or not HDMI is on, by the way. DANIEL PHAM: Hey, Dan, I think
you might want to move your head a little bit, too. DAN GALPIN: Yeah, you can see. That’s what’s going on here. So unfortunately, we can’t
really look at the gameplay of this, but I’ll get Koh talk
about it a little bit. IAN NI-LEWIS: Why don’t you
go ahead and just put the Nexus 7 up there? I think this seems to be
working all right. KOH KIM: Nex 7– [INAUDIBLE] I turn, be like, hey,
right here. Stay there. DAN GALPIN: There we are– Nexus 7 cam. To me, I don’t know whether
that’s a layout issue, because I haven’t tried it on other
tablet devices other than Nexus 7, but it could be. [SIDE CONVERSATION] KOH KIM: It’s kind of
like a Boggle game. So from the four-by-four set,
you need to swipe as many words as you possibly can,
which is pretty cool. I mean, it’s all this. DAN GALPIN: And it’s a real-time
game shared with everyone else. It’s very similar to Word Hero,
which we’ve looked at on the show before. I like the layout, actually. It looks really, really nice. The only thing I would say about
it is that it does feel a little bit borrowed from
another platform, in terms of look, with all the roundedness,
and all of the excessive use of gradients,
and stuff like that. IAN NI-LEWIS: By the way,
viewers at home, would you not all agree that Dan’s hair is
rich and luxurious, almost rock-star-like in its
silky splendor? KOH KIM: I’m kind of jealous. It’s a lot of volume. I wish I had that much volume. IAN NI-LEWIS: Right. Also, thank God Dan isn’t
leaning slightly to his left. Because then, his head would be
totally out of shot, and it would ruin it for
the rest of us. DAN GALPIN: Thank you, Ian. That’s why Ian’s producing the
show, so that he can drink more and make comments
like that. So (LAUGHING) here we are. KOH KIM: [LAUGHING] DAN GALPIN: So now, we’re
actually competing against the entire world. And there’s lots
of good stuff. KOH KIM: There’s a lot
of good stuff. DAN GALPIN: So the
game is fun. I love this kind of random
competition kind of game. I was a really huge
fan of Word Hero. You know, basically, I
want to see them do some nice tablet layouts. I think it’d be very, very cool
to see the words that you’re actually guessing in
larger form, side by side with the game board if you’re
on a tablet layout. And, again, there’s just a lot
more that can be done here. KOH KIM: People need to see. There we go. DAN GALPIN: Now it’s total
rock star thanks to my makeover expert over
there on the right. So, anyway, I don’t have
really much more to say about this. Because this is a real-time
game, this is actually a good game for actually putting
up a dialog. It’s very, very rare that I
would actually suggest putting up a dialog like this. But this is real time, so
actually exiting the game does kind of ruin your ability to
play that particular round. So it makes sense, and it does
take you back here to the level screen, and then
that takes you out. So that’s all good navigation. The rest of the games will
actually work on the Transformer [INAUDIBLE]– KOH KIM: Yes, we promise. Sorry. DAN GALPIN: But that particular
game, we did actually have to go through some
additional effort to get it to work. And, again, being able to
test on one tablet is always a good thing. It’s kind of unusual because
it looks like that game is using the framework, so it’s
kind of strange thing to see a game that’s having trouble that
is using the framework. All right, we are going in order
here, so the next game is Stack-A-Ball. KOH KIM: OK, so we can switch
cams because this one actually works. DAN GALPIN: We can actually
switch views, and we’re now in a portrait game. And in Stack-A-Ball, the goal is
to make the balls stack to match the shadows that
you see here at the bottom of the level. KOH KIM: It’s kind of
like reverse Tetris. So the object is to stack the
balls, as many as you can, without actually having three
balls connecting at any time. And so you’re supposed to
keep stacking until you run out of balls. DAN GALPIN: And this is going
to be really un-fun on my tablet, because it does take
advantage of an accelerometer. So usually when I rotate, this
thing will lose HDMI. We’ll try to be really
careful here. Ian likes to point out how
dorky this looks when I’m actually using the keyboard with
an accelerometer game, and it really does. But on the other hand,
I tend to not lose HDMI quite as often. Do you have to tap the screen to
release the balls, so part of the challenge is actually an
arcade-like like challenge. And it’s kind of unfortunately
random also, so you see if those three balls touch,
they get destroyed. But since the balls come in
apparently random colors, the challenge is also somewhat
random, which is a little unfortunate. KOH KIM: Well, the one big
thing I actually have a problem with is I never know
when I’m actually done. Because it says just
keep going until there’s no more balls. But it’d be nice for the ball
counter to be the reverse count, not how many balls I
have going down the thing. And it’s also pretty
slow, too. I mean, for an arcade
game, that’s kind of like all about falling. I mean, the cool thing about
Tetris or any building block game is that it actually
speeds up. And here, you really can’t
control the speed of the ball, which is a little strange. DAN GALPIN: I really do want to
be able to swipe down the balls until it’s done. But the other thing is you just
end up getting a whole bunch of blue balls like these
in a row in this distribution. You do end up with this kind
of unfortunate situation of the balls just all destroy
each other. So I’m not really sure what
to do about that. Now, again, the goal is to stack
up the balls so they do match the ball shadows. And that’s going to be really
hard for me, because I’m going to actually have to destroy
some blue balls here. KOH KIM: Yeah, because
he’s kind of run out. No, but you can keep stacking
on the left. You can just create
a third one. DAN GALPIN: But the goal is to
actually make them match. So that’s the challenge here. IAN NI-LEWIS: I totally
don’t understand. The goal is to make them match,
but you also need to get them higher? KOH KIM: Yeah, I
don’t think so. I think we don’t want
them to match. IAN NI-LEWIS: I think the goal
is to not make them match. KOH KIM: No, the goal is
not to make them match. DAN GALPIN: No, the goal
is to make the balls match the shadows. KOH KIM: Right. But if you match three of the
same balls, then they’re going to destroy everything, right? DAN GALPIN: So the key thing is
we want to make the balls match the shadow, but we
also don’t want to go above the shadow. We have to fit all the balls
into the shadow area. IAN NI-LEWIS: Oh, OK. So what you’re saying is you’ve
got two rows right now. If you were to stack it
three-high, that’s no good? DAN GALPIN: Yes,
that’s correct. And you exactly match
the puzzle there. IAN NI-LEWIS: Oh. DAN GALPIN: And because the ball
distribution seems to be pretty random, it can be kind
of random-difficult. I think one of the challenges
with building a game like this is getting the difficulty
consistent. And the two games that I think
that struggle with randomness are this game and Word Push. Both of them really get you
very different levels of challenge, depending on which
random numbers you get. This game actually does
have physics, though, which is kind of cool. So you’ll see that if there’s
actually real physics going on when the balls fall, which
sometimes is helpful and sometimes is not. KOH KIM: Yeah. I think they used Box2D. DAN GALPIN: Probably. Yeah. Did they say that? KOH KIM: Yeah, they said that in
the About notes if you look carefully enough. DAN GALPIN: I did complete the
beginner level there, as you see, which is cool. KOH KIM: But also, yeah,
it takes a while. DAN GALPIN: So things
to note about this. This game sort of uses
Android things. If you click the Back key, once
again, we just exit the game immediately. This game is just, again, not
modifying the standard activity behavior, and it does
a lot of things in the same activities. Select level is also done
in the activity, hitting the Back key, Quit. However, they do push up another
activity for when they are doing the– high scores– when they’re doing the Help. So you see, that’s another
activity, how hitting the Back key does the right thing,
takes you back here to where we were. So this is another game that’s
navigationally challenged. Again, it just doesn’t
make sense. If I hit Select Level, it feels
like the Back key should bring me back here. And, also, it sort of forces me,
in this case, to actually select something, which is,
like, what do if I don’t want to select something? Well, you select
the same thing. So, again, I think from an
Android perspective, it doesn’t make sense. Putting an OK at the bottom
here of the high scores is not necessary. It’s not a dialog. It doesn’t look like one to the
user, so it’s not needed. What we really do need is the
Back key not to just quit out of the game at this point. So that’s what I wanted to
say about Stack-A-Ball. We have three games that we
really did love here. Let’s start off with
Rope Rescue. So Rope Rescue to our helpful
technical director here. KOH KIM: Yeah, so
Rope Rescue– and so this is actually
really cool. Because if you look at it, I
mean, even from the splash screen, you can automatically
start controlling the character, which I think
is a great way to integrate and all that. For one thing, we’ve seen all
these games like Cut the Rope or all this stuff. You’re like, oh, let’s cut
something, or, oh, let’s destroy something. Well, this one’s actually
really interesting. You basically take rope, and
you figure out once we get past the oh, no, what
am I supposed to do? So the object of the game is
you’re supposed to take your rope and hook up on all the
wheels, and then unlock your baby birds that have
now been captured. And what’s really cool, there’s
different elements. What’s great is that it’s a
great way of beginning setting up the levels. It tells you, OK, first, this
is what you need to do to unlock the birdcage. Here are some of the hazards
you need to watch out for. So in this case, it’s a knife. Knife cuts rope. You don’t want that to happen. It’s kind of sad. So there’s some other stuff,
too, like fire. Fire burns everything. Probably bad for you, et
cetera, et cetera. DAN GALPIN: I think the really
interesting thing about this game is that– so they’re
showing you here how we can avoid the knife. So you do have to touch every
single one of the loops, but you can loop around
them like that. And what’s fun about this
game is it is a 2-D game, but it’s using– in as far as the user’s input
and control of it– but it is done in 3-D space with 3-D birds
and some really nice looking graphics. And they actually get a little
bit of benefit from that, too. The backgrounds are fuzzy and
a little blurry, because they’re a little lower
resolution than this device. But the actual game looks very,
very high resolution, and the text looks very
high resolution. IAN NI-LEWIS: Do you think it’s
actually that they’re blurry because of the device,
or do you think it’s an intentional depth
of field effect? DAN GALPIN: I don’t think it’s
intentional, but I think it works very well for them. That was my feeling. I could be wrong, there, but
it felt like [INAUDIBLE] graphic. So, in this case, there’s
actually a shorter path, [INAUDIBLE]. And so there’s two interesting
things about this. It looks like we actually– KOH KIM: Ah, I can’t get
the shorter path. We have to wait. Oh, I know what it is. We have to wait till they– DAN GALPIN: –until they get
into the right place. So there’s actually– like that. KOH KIM: Right. DAN GALPIN: –I believe
is the shortest path. So again, the game
is pretty cool. Honestly, there aren’t a lot of
issues with this game, in terms of technical issues. I was really impressed
with it. It’s great to see a game
here that’s pretty much ready to go. KOH KIM: Another cool thing
about this game is that if you go back to the menu, and then
you can actually see the bird sanctuary on the lower right. And you can see all the little
birds that you’ve actually saved, including, hopefully,
the butterflies. The one nice-to-have I’d like
about this is that this would be pretty cool as a live
wallpaper just to track your progress. So if there’s any way to
do that, that’s just kind of nice to have. DAN GALPIN: I think that would
actually take this game over the top, definitely, to have
the bird sanctuary as your live wallpaper. I think it’d be really cool. It’d be fun to use some
more interactions with the birds, too. You know, you could
feed the birds. You could do whatever. Overall, again, this game
is just very well done. Ooh, Back key doesn’t
work out of that bird sanctuary, though. KOH KIM: Yes. DAN GALPIN: Unfortunate. KOH KIM: But there’s a Back key
in the actual thing, but you don’t probably need the– DAN GALPIN: On-screen Back
is generally bad. Also, you see on-screen Back
here, so, in general, on-screen Back is not something
that Android users are accustomed to using across
all their games and apps. We’d rather have no on-screen
Back [INAUDIBLE] Back key support like that. But other than in that screen,
the Back key support looks really, really, good. Navigation’s important
in all these things. KOH KIM: Good job, guys. DAN GALPIN: Awesome. Another game that we really
liked was iBlast Moki 2. IAN NI-LEWIS: Before you get
into iBlast Moki 2, though, folks, I just want to take
a quick beer score. KOH KIM: Beer score? IAN NI-LEWIS: How
many of you– yeah– have you even gotten past the
neck of your beer, Daniel? DAN GALPIN: I haven’t even
started drinking yet. IAN NI-LEWIS: No, you haven’t. KOH KIM: He hasn’t even
started drinking. At least I’ve gotten past
the neck of my beer. Come on. IAN NI-LEWIS: What
do you think? KOH KIM: Look at– see? DAN GALPIN: I know. IAN NI-LEWIS: So this
is the thing. You know, when I host
this show, I’m drinking all the time. What’s different? What makes you guys so much– I don’t want to say better,
but different? KOH KIM: I’m a girl. DAN GALPIN: That’s true. She is. IAN NI-LEWIS: Oh, come on. Wait a second– no. I seem to recall that you are
the girl who asked for the beers in bottles, as opposed
to, you know, poured in glasses or something
like that. KOH KIM: I did, but I like
enjoying my beer. Come on now. [CHUCKLING] DAN GALPIN: Exactly. IAN NI-LEWIS: Just checking. What do you think, though,
seriously? DAN GALPIN: I think
it’s actually– I like it. No, I really do. IAN NI-LEWIS: Just smell it. Just sort of wave it
past your nose. KOH KIM: I like the smell. I like raspberry. It’s a very interesting
[? take. ?] IAN NI-LEWIS: On the nose,
there’s a little raspberry, but on the palate,
it’s super malty. DAN GALPIN: Yeah. KOH KIM: Yeah. DAN GALPIN: I’m really happy. It really is a subtle raspberry
flavor, but it’s not overpowering. It adds a lot to
the complexity. IAN NI-LEWIS: Right. Yeah. I just had to check, because
honestly, this has become one of my favorite beers. I really, really like it. Buying it today was– it was hard to actually share. So I wanted to see if things
were going all right. KOH KIM: It was awesome. Ian always comes through
at all the beers. IAN NI-LEWIS: There you go. KOH KIM: Make sure that
we enjoy our Fridays. DAN GALPIN: Absolutely. He comes through in a lot
of ways, actually. IAN NI-LEWIS: There you go. Oh, yeah. DAN GALPIN: But beer is
definitely one of them. IAN NI-LEWIS: And by the way– I’m sorry– while I have the
floor, I do want to shout out to our friend, Markus
Gusenbauer, in Austria. Hope you’re enjoying an awesome
beer yourself, sir. He’s one who said, a glass of
beer and a Friday review– what else do you need
on a Friday night? DAN GALPIN: Exactly. IAN NI-LEWIS: Rock
on, my friend. DAN GALPIN: It really depends
on how much beer. Because I’ve found this
show goes down well with a lot of beer. So one thing you’ll see here
right at the beginning of iBlast Moki 2. There’s Play, Create, and
Share as your function. Wow. KOH KIM: I mean, even
just going back, just restart the game. I think this is probably one of
the best intro screens I’ve seen for a game. So after the title. Unfortunately, there’s
no audio, unless they can hear audio. But the fact that there’s
Godzilab, I mean, you just have to start the game. It’s pretty amazing. [CHUCKLING] DAN GALPIN: I love the
design of the screen. It feels really good. There’s not lots of icons
cluttering things everywhere, and you got three
huge functions– Play, Create and Share. And first of all, let me just
say that having a level creator built into your
game is incredible. And there is OpenFeint. KOH KIM: Right. There’s OpenFeint We’ll
say no thank you for now, or enable it. DAN GALPIN: I’ll enable it. KOH KIM: All right. DAN GALPIN: That’s cool. But the fact that you can
actually go online– look at levels– you can actually
go and create your own levels in the game– is really, really awesome
functionality. So this gives the game just
an enormous long-term playability. And I actually kind of wonder
whether they used this at all to build levels, actually,
within the game, because it is pretty highly functional. KOH KIM: Although, one
thing I do wish– oh, there’s the Back key. It’s like, back, back,
redo, whoa. Anyway, I thought the level
creator was really cute. DAN GALPIN: Absolutely. There’s really a lot
you can do with it. So these are all elements you’ll
see in the game, but because I thought this was such
a beautiful and unique feature, I wanted to at
least call it out. You know, really, really
great [INAUDIBLE]– KOH KIM: Couldn’t even play
it, even though it’s– DAN GALPIN: [INAUDIBLE] physics puzzler. KOH KIM: Sorry. DAN GALPIN: This kind of physics
puzzler, you can actually create your
own stuff with. And I think, you know, a lot
of times, one of the complaints that I keep talking
about in this generation of computing is that there isn’t
enough content creation. These are all kind of hunt
and consumption devices. But it’s great to see a game
that actually allows people to do user-generated [INAUDIBLE]. KOH KIM: It’s a really
nice surprise, too. I didn’t even know this content
creator existed until I actually looked at it. But let’s go back to the
actual game, like go in to the Play. So it’s an arcade level,
kind of like another physics-based puzzler. But it’s actually pretty cool. We’ll play the first level. But a lot of it is you have
these little things– I’m a sucker for cute
puzzler games. But what’s really cool is you
basically use bombs, and what you’re supposed to do is take
the little creatures and use the bombs strategically so that
you can put them in this red portal. DAN GALPIN: And one of the
things I really like is that they make use of simple graphics
for their tutorials. There’s no text in
the tutorial. It makes it really, really easy
for the game developer, in terms of actually
internationalizing this game. You certainly don’t need to know
English in order to play this game, which is great. It’s also very, very
straightforward. So, really, just a beautiful
job done there. KOH KIM: And great job also
on the audio, as well. I think for one thing is, a
lot of mobile games don’t really take advantage– I’m actually really sad. You guys can’t even hear some
of the audio for this game. But this game in particular has
some great music, great sound effects. And even just the
transitions– simple transitions, as
going between levels and all that stuff. You can really tell that
the devs put a lot of effort into this. DAN GALPIN: The interface is
also really, really well thought out. Closer to make them fly away. There’s a little bit of English,
but not a lot. And, again, you can see that his
level there is controlled by how I actually
move this is. This is a really
nice interface. And then, once again,
he’s all set. So now, we’re going to blow
these up, and boom! We can actually also change the
timing, which gets more important as we get farther
and farther into the game. So the only real technical
feedback I had for this team was that the game does actually
restart the music when you do pause and unpause. And so if you’re in the middle
of a song, it starts you back over at the beginning, which is
a little bit unfortunate, because you don’t even realize
the sound is playing at the beginning of the music, because
it’s very, very quiet. Which is nice, and I can see how
that would be useful, but it’s also something that was a
little bit jarring when I was actually in the middle
of playing it. But that’s a really
minor issue. Honestly, I did not find
anything significantly wrong with this game. This game is absolutely ready. In fact, it may even
be featured now. KOH KIM: Yeah, it may be ready
to be featured now. But I think what’s really cool
is variety of gameplay, different uses of bombs,
and then also different uses of time, too. It’s definitely very
well thought out. The one thing that I do have a
little bit of problems with is that I think it requires you to
three-star in every level before you move to
the next world. It’s great to add
that challenge. DAN GALPIN: Well, the other
thing here that was interesting– you notice how
this stuff is cut off the top? KOH KIM: Right. DAN GALPIN: So this is because
we’re on HDMI. So if I pull out HDMI– could
we switch to the other view? So we’ll switch over to
the other view here. We’ll pull out the HDMI. One thing you can’t actually see
here is that, actually, it isn’t really cut off. So this means they’re actually
not responding. Oh, we’re getting
a little audio. I should turn that off. KOH KIM: There it
is, right there. DAN GALPIN: There we are. Sorry. But You see here that it’s
not cut off anymore. So we’re not responding quite
correctly to the screen size changes that are happening when
the HDMI cable is in. And so that’s causing the top of
the screen to get cut off. And you can see here how many
stars I’m currently working on and how many points I’ve gotten
across the levels. So that was my only comment with
the game, was it didn’t quite handle this ratio
on this device. KOH KIM: Oh, that’s kind
of sad, but, anyway. DAN GALPIN: Yeah, three level
to unlock this bonus world. That being said, the
game is filled with amazing, rich content. And we really loved it here. So, great job, guys. And there’s bombs to do all
sorts of different things. There are bombs that– KOH KIM: Glue bombs, where
you can stick the Mokis. There’s the slick bombs. What else is there? You use the bombs to take
people off the glue. It’s really very clever,
well done. And I didn’t even get to the
second world, because it takes me three stars on every level,
which I’m not there yet. DAN GALPIN: One thing that’s
very, very cool that is you can also apply the bomb
effects to characters. So, one of the cool levels– KOH KIM: I think it was the
boulder level, right? I think it was this level. DAN GALPIN: Is that
level there? Yeah. We’re on this view here. So one of the levels, you
actually have to solve by actually applying the glue
to the bomb itself. So you can see the
bomb is there. And I’m going to now apply the
glue to the bomb, and boom. KOH KIM: Now it’s covered
in green. DAN GALPIN: [INAUDIBLE] the
bomb’s covered in glue, and so he will usually– KOH KIM: And it’s sticking–
oh, no, you usually pick up all three, but he only picked
up one this time. That’s OK. DAN GALPIN: But I just
didn’t have him quite centered well enough. He does have to be centered
right in the middle of it. As an example of– KOH KIM: Whee! Whee! Oh, wait, there it is. There he goes. Oh, all three. DAN GALPIN: So, again,
lots of really clever puzzles in this game. So, yes, definitely thumbs up. And on top of that, with the
level creation and the [INAUDIBLE], it really does
have a lot going for it. KOH KIM: The only question I
have for the devs when are you coming out with plushies? I would totally buy
your plushies. DAN GALPIN: Again, on-screen
Back key, in general, we don’t like here. I’d rather not see that. It isn’t everywhere
in the game. Most of the time, it
doesn’t have it. That was my only other comment
for things to change. KOH KIM: Overall, great job. DAN GALPIN: Thumbs up. KOH KIM: Thumbs up. Moving on. DAN GALPIN: So those are the six
that we planed to look at, but we do have one
bonus game here– KOH KIM: Bonus round! DAN GALPIN: –which is
Puppy’s Plaything. Now, one of the problems with
Puppy’s Plaything is that it actually takes an incredibly
long time to load. And this isn’t so bad here at
the beginning, although, again, having some sort of
animated progress is a really, really nice thing to have. IAN NI-LEWIS: I’m sorry. I just have to ask because
I looked at this screen. Is the name of this company
Smut Works? KOH KIM: Smuttlewerk. IAN NI-LEWIS: (GERMAN
ACCENT) Smuttlewerk. OK. DAN GALPIN: And you’ll see
[INAUDIBLE] here, there’s lots of stuff here that
are going on. Some of this is in, I think, the
PlayPhone middleware, and some of this is actually
in the game. It takes a long time, by the
way, for it to actually get to where I can click
on these things. So [INAUDIBLE] your dog here, and
you can see I’m– KOH KIM: Can’t really
rename your dog. DAN GALPIN: I’m [INAUDIBLE]
screen right now, and it took me forever to get through this
the first time I played this. So there’s just a lot of places
in which they have to look at threading
and how they’re actually handling this. Now, I actually played this on
my Nexus and did not play it on the Transformer Prime. KOH KIM: But even on my Nexus,
there’s definitely some performance [INAUDIBLE]. Like sometimes when you hit Back
and exit out of the game, and then when you want to try
and resume, it takes like 10 seconds to load. DAN GALPIN: So the real
issue is this. I hit go to my lock screen. I’ve now locked the device. I unlock the device. Well, now, of course, that
worked just fine. Let’s go to the home screen,
and I’m going to hit this. I’m going to go back into the
play house, and you’ll see that this is what you get. Now, you might think
your device has crashed at this point. KOH KIM: Right– like,
what happened? DAN GALPIN: What is
going on here? Is the game actually
going to recover? Am I ever going to see the
title screen ever again? Now, sometimes it actually
does crash. Sometimes it actually manages
to recover from this state. KOH KIM: Yeah. And it looks like we
got maybe a crash. Maybe. Maybe. DAN GALPIN: So, on this game,
also, out of the three high-end games is the only one
that does not use and target SDK level 11 or above. We are seeing the compatibility
menu showing up here, which is unfortunate. But we aren’t seeing a zoom
control, so at least it’s doing some of the work there. And I think now it’s
just totally lost. It’s having a lot of trouble
on this device. So, yeah, in fact, there were
some comments about various problems here. But you’ll see we can actually
go into the game. After spending all of this work
on a game, you really, really want to see the game do
well, and so having these little glitches hold up the
game is unfortunate. And the game is fun. It is a sliding game
done in 3D. And you get the idea of how
these kinds of games work. So the puzzler is that I can
choose the direction that dog is going to go in. The goal is to not only get to
the ball, but to get all of the bones, in this case
moving across here. And it’s got a light source,
which is fun. A lot of games don’t use dynamic
lighting, so it’s having fun with its
single dynamic light, and that’s cool. What it really comes down to
right now is polish on the platform and getting
to that next level. It also looks like there may
be some issues with the PlayPhone middleware itself. And, again, there’s also
actually some arcade-y elements to this. And I just did this wrong. That’s OK. I’m going to get a bad score. KOH KIM: It’s OK. We’re not all perfect. It’s fine. DAN GALPIN: I know. I know. I should’ve known
this already. But as you can see, it
is definitely fun. It’s actually a very, very
simple game with very, very complex presentation and a
very nice presentation. And so I got one star. KOH KIM: One star. It’s OK. You completed the level. DAN GALPIN: I’ve got
all the bones. See, here’s where it gets
arcade-y, where you actually have to time now his movements
so you don’t hit the bat. But other than that, this level
is like pretty much all of the other levels
in the game. KOH KIM: Yeah, this is the one
where I was trying to figure out how to get to the bone. It’s OK, whatever. It’s all right. DAN GALPIN: I actually
see how to do that. In any case, the game is fun. And really, it’s these little
polish details. It’s very, very important,
though, that if you’re going to have a game– especially, this is a very
high-end device. This is a [INAUDIBLE] [? three ?] device. It’s got a gig of RAM on it. If you’re going to reload all
of the textures, and all of the geometry, and all of the
shaders, after a pause, which you may have to do any time,
you really do need to have some progress indicator to let
people know that their device hasn’t crashed. Because the experience of
exiting the game and going back into the game– oh, interesting. So that way, it works
fine from there. I guess if it gets swapped out,
then that’s where it gets into trouble. So that was this game. That was, once again,
Puppy’s Plaything. And it was not actually in the
top six, but it looked intriguing. KOH KIM: Yeah. I mean, puppies are great. IAN NI-LEWIS: I recall
that I actually made you guys review this. I’m like, oh, dude, we should
totally look at this on the strength of the video alone. And it was really because
of puppies. KOH KIM: Puppies, yeah. I mean, I probably maybe
would have liked to have seen kittens. But it’s OK. IAN NI-LEWIS: You know, I don’t
know what your thing is with kittens. What do you have against
puppies? KOH KIM: I like both puppies
and kittens. Kittens are pretty
adorable, too. IAN NI-LEWIS: Wait, we’ve
got the wrong– yea– I don’t know what you have
against puppies, Koh. What the hell is your
problem, Koh? KOH KIM: I have nothing
against puppies. I like kittens, though, too. IAN NI-LEWIS: Yeah, whatever. OK, thanks KOH KIM: Such a hater. Dude, cats are where it is
on the internet, man. I mean, everyone watches
cat videos. DAN GALPIN: Exactly. IAN NI-LEWIS: That’s true. I bet there’s no kitten that
looks as cute on ice as that puppy does, though. Look at him sliding around. He’s got his legs
all splayed out. KOH KIM: Well, it’s a
puppy, first of all, not a kitten, but– DAN GALPIN: Actually, I think
the main problem with a cat for this game is the cat
would just be angry. It’d be like, rarr!– freaking
out [INAUDIBLE] on the ice. IAN NI-LEWIS: Rarr! Screw you guys! KOH KIM: So cats probably also
have claws, too, so it probably wouldn’t work as well
on ice versus the puppy. IAN NI-LEWIS: Actually,
cats are kind of evil, don’t you think? DAN GALPIN: [CHUCKLING] KOH KIM: I don’t know. Cats are pretty independent. I don’t know. DAN GALPIN: Actually, I just
think ice– you know, my cat would be seriously pissed
off if it were sliding around on the ice. IAN NI-LEWIS: Yeah,
no kidding. Yeah, puppies, FTW. [INAUDIBLE]. DAN GALPIN: It could
be kittens, though. Kittens looking kind of cute and
wobbly on the ice would be [INAUDIBLE]. All right. Anyways– KOH KIM: But, anyways, that’s
all we have for today, right? DAN GALPIN: That is all
we have for today. KOH KIM: What are we
doing next week? DAN GALPIN: That is
a good question. IAN NI-LEWIS: We’re actually
doing NFL football. KOH KIM: Oh, it’s sports. Yeah! DAN GALPIN: Specifically,
NFL football. KOH KIM: NFL football? That’s too bad. I mean, soccer is a
much bigger sport. Or I should say football,
the real football. IAN NI-LEWIS: No! KOH KIM: Why? DAN GALPIN: We are getting
to the start of football. So we do have a series
here of games. We actually are probably not
going to have quite as many NFL football games. But, again, it doesn’t have to
be a pure football game. It could be a kick simulation. For example, there are games
that are just, you know, kick a ball through the– KOH KIM: –the field goal. It could be a field goal game. It could be fantasy football,
football manager. This is probably going to be my
week, but, unfortunately, I’m going to be at PAX. IAN NI-LEWIS: No, I think
that’s wonderful. So Koh is going to be at PAX. And we are super excited. She is going to be reporting
from PAX live. KOH KIM: I don’t know
about live. IAN NI-LEWIS: She’s going to
be using modern technology. KOH KIM: By modern,
you mean my phone. [LAUGHING] IAN NI-LEWIS: That’s right. DAN GALPIN: She’s going to be
taking videos [INAUDIBLE]. IAN NI-LEWIS: Wait, I’m
sorry, is your phone not an Android phone? Isn’t that modern– even postmodern technology? KOH KIM: It’s an Android phone. See?– Galaxy Nexus. It’s OK. IAN NI-LEWIS: Wouldn’t you say
that you’re living in the future with your Nexus S, Koh? KOH KIM: I’m always living in
the– it’s not a Nexus S. It’s a Galaxy Nexus, dude. [CHUCKLING] Nexus S is so last year. Come on. IAN NI-LEWIS: Actually,
you know what, Koh? We’re going to give you an
even newer phone for PAX. KOH KIM: Oh. DAN GALPIN: Oh. IAN NI-LEWIS: Oh, yeah. KOH KIM: Oh. So if any of you are attending
PAX next week, definitely try to find me. I’ll probably be wandering the
Indie Megabooth or somewhere around there. So if you have a game to show
me, be sure to try to find me. I’ll definitely give
you a couple of minutes to look at it. IAN NI-LEWIS: You didn’t really
introduce yourself. What do you do for Google? KOH KIM: What do I
do for Google? IAN NI-LEWIS: Besides
review games. KOH KIM: Besides review games? I work with game developers to
bring their games to Google Play and all Google platforms. And so maybe a big deal? Maybe? Probably not. I’m not that big of a deal. IAN NI-LEWIS: Koh is
a really big deal. For all of those of you who
thought I was a big deal or Dan was a big deal– DAN GALPIN: I don’t think
anyone, actually, thought I was a big deal. IAN NI-LEWIS: No, actually there
were some people who thought you were a big– those
in the know knew that you were a big deal. You were the power behind
the Google Play throne. But now, Koh has usurped
your position. DAN GALPIN: That’s
true, actually. IAN NI-LEWIS: And mine. KOH KIM: Mostly because I
fulfill a demographic that’s kind of weird and rare, but– DAN GALPIN: What demographic
is that? KOH KIM: Well, I’m bringing
diversity to the show now. I mean, before it was
two Caucasian males. [LAUGHING] IAN NI-LEWIS: Hey! DAN GALPIN: We had Daniel
Pham here last week and [INAUDIBLE]– IAN NI-LEWIS: We rather prefer
the word “white.” KOH KIM: White? OK? I was trying to be politically
correct. IAN NI-LEWIS: We’re like two
white guys– actually, we’re two old, white guys. DAN GALPIN: Old, white guys–
yeah, absolutely. KOH KIM: Old? OK. I didn’t think you
were that old. IAN NI-LEWIS: Oh, hell yeah. Did you see my picture before
we replaced it with that awesome picture of you? Yeah, my hair had so much
gray in it, like more gray than normal. Daniel Pham really did an
excellent job of [INAUDIBLE]– DANIEL PHAM: Thanks, guys. DAN GALPIN: So, anyways,
we are wrapping up. Again, we did say NFL football,
not because it has to be licensed by the
NFL, but what we’re talking about is American– KOH KIM: American
football games. IAN NI-LEWIS: Actually, I seem
to recall that the person who said NFL football was actually
[? Ray Toh ?] when we asked, how will we
distinguish it from “real football?” No, actually,
[? Ray Toh ?] doesn’t have– [INTERPOSING VOICES] DAN GALPIN: It’s
Scottish there. It’s real football. [INTERPOSING VOICES] DAN GALPIN: We play
with someone’s severed skull in Scotland. And that’s not like Americans’
pigskin, you know. KOH KIM: I do hope we do cover
real football games, though, because, I mean, that’s also
starting up as well. IAN NI-LEWIS: Do you
mean soccer? KOH KIM: In America,
it’s soccer. But outside of the US,
it is football. IAN NI-LEWIS: The point is that
next week is the start of the NFL season. And, actually, we’re doing this
in the App Review, too. So, yeah, fantasy football
games, apps for tracking your favorite team, apps that
involve kicking around, really, any ball that’s
not round, but more of an oblong shape. KOH KIM: Or even tackling
games are fun, too, man. DAN GALPIN: Live wallpapers that
are truly awesome around NFL football. There’s really a lot of
options out there. Also, I will say– I wanted to note that “soccer”
is actually a British term to describe what is the ball. That’s how we got it. But then the Brits decided
they didn’t like that term anymore. IAN NI-LEWIS: Ooh, kind
of like roundabouts. DAN GALPIN: Exactly. So “soccer” is perfectly
acceptable. It came from the UK, so
therefore, they must find it acceptable. IAN NI-LEWIS: (BRITISH ACCENT)
The only thing we say in a British accent must
be believed. Do you know why? Because– actually, I have no idea why. Why do you speak in a British
accent so often, Dan? [INTERPOSING VOICES] DAN GALPIN: Because, obviously,
that’s what the announcers on those made-for-TV
products are using, so– IAN NI-LEWIS: That’s
true– or the BBC. DAN GALPIN: (BRITISH ACCENT)
This is really an amazing tablet– this Nexus 7. You’ve got to see
it right now. Look what you can do. You can use it as a tea tray. [INAUDIBLE] KOH KIM: Oh, my God. DAN GALPIN: Look it it. Transformer Prime. All the amazing uses this
device has, you see? IAN NI-LEWIS: What kind of
cable subscription and/or [INAUDIBLE] stash do
you have, Dan? Oh, my God. KOH KIM: But I suppose Dr.
Who is starting up soon DAN GALPIN: Exactly. So I’ve just offended all of
the British and Australian viewers of this show, so I
wanted to apologize for my poor approximation of an accent
from the British Isles. IAN NI-LEWIS: That was the
first time Dan has ever apologized for his
British accent. KOH KIM: I know. This is a new one for me. IAN NI-LEWIS: –even though it
has been deployed more than 100 times in the past year. DAN GALPIN: That’s true. But you started it. KOH KIM: You started it. OK, now we’re starting with
who started what. Why am I in the middle of this? OK? IAN NI-LEWIS: Yeah, break
this up, Koh. Come on. KOH KIM: Ah, jeez. Well, anyway, thanks for
your time, guys. Thank you to Daniel Pham. IAN NI-LEWIS: Oh, look it! It’s engineer Daniel! KOH KIM: Woo! [CLAPPING] DAN GALPIN: [CLAPPING] IAN NI-LEWIS: Woo! KOH KIM: Hopefully, I’ll see you
all in Seattle next week. Definitely wave. Stop me and say hi. IAN NI-LEWIS: Hey, man,
we’re not paying for this by the minute. DAN GALPIN: We started
late, also. Remember that. DANIEL PHAM: We did
start late. That’s true. DAN GALPIN: So, next week,
coming from PAX in Seattle, we’re going to have Koh Kim. So definitely find her. Say hello. And she’s going to be finding
some awesome stuff for us to talk about. KOH KIM: Hopefully–
hopefully– I’m sure. DAN GALPIN: NFL football in both
the App Review and the Game [? View. ?] Go to the moderator page and
nominate your favorite stuff. And I think that’s
pretty much it. KOH KIM: With that– DAN GALPIN: Enjoy– have
a great weekend. KOH KIM: Have a good
weekend, all. IAN NI-LEWIS: And you guys,
thanks very much for everybody on the comment stream,
especially Gabrielle, Martin, Marcus, and, oh,
1995 [? meh. ?] DAN GALPIN: All right. IAN NI-LEWIS: I’m not
really sure how to pronounce that name. KOH KIM: OK. IAN NI-LEWIS: Thanks
a lot, you guys. We really appreciate it. See you next week. KOH KIM: See you. DAN GALPIN: See you.

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