Tobacco Dependence Program

Tobacco Dependence Program


(upbeat music) – I’m Ellen Schmidt, Nurse Practitioner in the Department of Surgery
at the University of Rochester. We see a lot of patients
that don’t have an interest in quitting smoking at their
initial visit or consult, but once they understand the complications that can occur and can be avoided when you quit smoking before an operation, they are much more
enthusiastic to at least try. And that’s why we recommend they see a smoking cessation specialist. With interventions weekly
or every other week, as well as, medications
and nicotine replacement, they really are successful, especially four weeks before an operation. Research shows that the risk of heart attack, stroke, pneumonia, immune system, which is your
body’s defense mechanism, you can decrease those risks by about 30%. Eight weeks before an operation, studies show that you’re
actually improving your lung function as well and you’ll have less complications in pulmonary function too. So, less risk of pneumonia. I see patients that wanna quit smoking usually referred by their
surgeon, or self-referred. Our surgeons recommend
that you see someone because smoking cessation
is much more effective when you have intervention
with a health provider that specializes in smoking cessation. So, you can be referred by
your primary care physician, your surgeon, or you can
actually just refer yourself. – So, this program is different in that most people don’t talk
to health care providers around stopping smoking. You increase your odds of quitting by both using medications and counseling. We offer a one-on-one
individual counseling which is not something
that you really get much of when it comes to stopping
smoking in the community. The one-on-one counseling
sessions are really focused on education, a planning, strategizing
around stopping smoking, and prescribing medications. We also do phone
consultations and telehealth via your smartphone or computer or tablet. So, if you can’t get into the office, you have a lot of options of
staying in contact with us. – Okay.
– Do you have any questions for me about this or how it works, or why it would be
better to meet in person? All patients are different. Everyone has different
ideas about what works, what doesn’t work, and my
job is to try to figure out what’s the best way for that person. So, there’s no real right way to do it. The right way to do it is
whatever way works for you. Patients typically work with
us on a weekly basis early on. Usually, weekly until they’re
quit for about a month, and then every two to four weeks after six months after their last puff. But that’s not a hard and fast rule. We work with people at whatever
pace is meaningful to them. We have a lot of research that shows that the more time that
you spend talking with a health care provider
about stopping smoking, whether it be a counselor, a physician, a nurse, or someone else, the more time you spend, the
more likely you are to quit. The best time to stop smoking is any time. I work with people from age of 18 to 88. So, if you feel like you’re
ready to stop smoking or you’re not ready to stop smoking, or if you’re thinking about it, we’re happy to talk to you. So, you can find out
more about our programs at the Center for Community
Health and Prevention by either talking to your doctor or giving us a call at 585-530-2050.

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