Victoria Wilson Shares her Journey to Addiction Recovery

Victoria Wilson Shares her Journey to Addiction Recovery


All right. All right. Looks like
we’re recording. So Victoria, thank you very much for joining me. I’m just really excited to spend a couple
minutes getting to know a little bit more about your story and then hopefully
you’ll share some things about your story, about the work that you do that will be
of interest or a value to my Facebook community. So thanks for joining me. Absolutely. Thanks for having
me, Garret. Appreciate it. Yeah, you’re asking me on here today. Yeah. Well I appreciate you
making the time and show it up. So we’ll just kind of
jump right into it all. I want to spend about 10 or 15
minutes, so let’s jump right into it. What can you tell me about your
personal story? And of course, I mean this in the context
of the struggles with, or the battles with or just the
knowledge of addiction and of recovery, because I think that’ll be the greatest
value to my Facebook community. So what can you tell me
about your personal journey? Absolutely. So my personal
journey started when, uh, well, uh, 15, 20, 25 years ago I had, right? Yeah, no, I, uh, had been, um, dabbling in pills and, um, illicit drug activity and I recognized
pretty quickly that it could become a big problem. So a close family friend had
suggested my getting onto a program, uh, a mat program, uh, maintenance, uh, medical treatments. And
so I took that path, got onto the medical
assistant treatment and uh, that seemed to be okay. Uh, and through time I recognized that even
on the medical assisted treatments, I was relapsing and,
uh, chronic relapsing. It was debilitating and I recognized
that it was time for me to just clear myself of all of it. And I made attempts to get myself
cleared of being on any medical assistant treatment. Yeah. So what are some of the, what are some of the pros that
came from that and then obviously, because you ultimately
decided to get away from it, what were some of the biggest cons
that came from it or not? Uh, you know, or downsides to it. Okay. So the pros were that I would
have extended bouts of clean time, but then I would have also
periods of chronic relapse. So it didn’t feel stabilized in moments, but longterm it didn’t feel
for me to, to stabilize me. Yeah, that makes sense. Were there, was there a common trend between
those times that you relapsed? Like was there a certain trigger or a
certain insecurity or just, you know, a certain thing that seemed to show up
in your life right before you’d relapse that you kind of saw as a trend? Strong stress. Yeah, stress moments. Just the ebbs and flows
of like the ebbs of life, stressful moments, whether
it be worth stress. I was a functioning addict or uh, I was able to, but I was in college part
of that time. And so when I would have, uh, big papers to write things like
that, I would just revert back to, I would relapse. Right, right. Go back to that thing that you knew
that he’ll provide that release from the tension of the pain.
Yeah. Why? Yeah. So what, what would your advice or what are your
thoughts or what do you share with other people who are saying or who have
struggled and are saying like, Hey, what’s this mat? What
can you tell me about it? Are you for it or are you against it? Do
you have certain advice that you give? Right. Okay. So I do
have advice around that. So if someone is a long time user, long time chronic user, uh, I would advise if someone felt that that
was a good method for them to maybe get on Suboxone, get on a, I believe it’s
the betrayal shot that’s once a month. And this is specifically for
those. Uh, my specialty is opioids. And so if someone is taking pain pills, um, that could be a good
method or street heroin. Uh, but then for someone who’s only been
using for a short amount of time, they hurt their back. The doc
had been giving them medication. I would suggest someone,
uh, really doing, uh, taking other avenues, um, doing
some spirit work, going to, they needed to go into actual treatment, but not getting onto medical assisted
treatment because it can then become more debilitating. And that’s
what I think happened for me. I hadn’t been in the capacity to actually
be on methadone is what I was on for 15 years. Uh, yeah, it was a
very long time. I’m actually, I feel like I’m a miracle at this
point, quite frankly, because, well, don’t just get off of it. I did
make multitudes of attempts and, uh, I ended up having to, uh, transplant myself from one part of the
country to another, getting myself into, uh, the space to do the work. And
I was totally prepared for that. I think I took a good three months of
really working out the details and what that would look like for me and
my family. Yeah. And that’s it. Well, that’s not, so I’m a huge advocate for supporting
anybody’s journey in recovery, however that recovery looks for them
and however they want it to look. Um, and that’s one thing that I, you know, I’ll kind of warn people or just a
cautionary thing just to understand, but going mat, like that’s an awesome
step. If that’s the right one for you. It’s an step, but don’t
allow that to be the end. Like don’t allow that to
be the end point. You know, there’s so many benefits of
it in the the level, you know, the severity of the consequences that
can help reduce in your life. But it’s not yet, but it’s not
supposed to be like a stop gap. It’s not supposed to be
something that you’re on forever. So that should always kind
of be in your mind is like, what’s my coming off of this plan or
what’s my transition plan away from this? I say that, but then also
if, if that’s what, you know, if that’s what somebody wants their
recovery to look like and they feel like that’s the best they can do and they want
to stay on it for us or life will then that’s their decision also. And who am I
to say what their recoveries look like? But it sounds like you were
kind of aware that like, Hey, I don’t want to be on this forever.
It’s not really doing what I need. And, but you felt, did you feel
in prison to it or, or I just feel activated by it. I really truly felt chained to it for me. I had woken up sick every single morning. I have, yeah. So I was having daily withdrawals and
that just really didn’t feel good for me. And people are able to move through that
they recognize right away they’ll get their treatment and they’ll be okay. I personally wanted to get away from
that and uh, I’ve been able to, it’s, it’s been quite the journey and even
getting off of the methadone I think takes planning, careful planning, ensuring
that people are taking care of their, their whole being. And when
I say their whole being, I’m talking about spiritually,
emotionally, physically, especially physically this, these medications go into
our body and they affect us. The drugs had affected us. And so making sure that we
really are taking strong care, the physical forms so that the other
pieces can fall into place as well. Yeah. That’s great. Was there
something that happened, uh, you know, kind of when you decide when you were
committed and you were gonna make that change, is something happened,
it’s something come together. Was there something that really inspired
you or kind of gave you that little bit of extra courage to push you over and
help you transition from the mat to beyond it? Right. Uh, well, right. A series of events took place that I
personally would not like to get into. Oh yeah. No, that’s certainly fine. And really kind of what I’m getting at
is like were there positive things that kinda came together to give
you that courage or give
you that feeling of support so that you felt you could take that? Right? No, it wasn’t anything positive, really wasn’t anything positive
that took place for me. It was all negatory events. I was seeing that it was going to get
worse before it could ever get better. And I recognize that began to plan. So kind of like that moment of
clarity that you’re like, Oh, this journey can’t go any further. I
can’t go down this road any further. Right. Yeah. Well that’s good. I mean, it’s great that you recognize that. Unfortunately there’s a lot of people
that get to that place and either they don’t recognize it or
they do recognize it. But their sense of self worth and their
courage and their self esteem is just in such a terrible place that they say it
can’t go much further down this path but there’s nothing I can do to change it. So they continue down that path and very
fortunate for us that that wasn’t your story and very fortunate for the many
people that you get to inspire and work with. That wasn’t your story. Absolutely. So onto the people that
you do get to work with, you have some best advice
that you share with people. So two different audiences.
The first audience, people that are very new
in recovery, um, you know, their first zero to six months and then
people who have been in recovery for, for months or years. So starting
with that zero to six months, what, what’s something that you would
share with them to, um, you know, your best advice from
your, from your journey? Remembering that everything
takes time, that it is a process. Sometimes things can get
worse before it gets better. But to reach out and ask for the help, even for those who are being
helped to continue asking for help. You can’t ask for help just once and
then think that things are going to get better. It’s a process continually on the daily
to reach out for the support that you need. So for the longterm people, uh wow. I guess it
would be the same thing. Continuing to remember that it’s, it really is a process and uh, that it’s always growth and
development always. Yeah. I always thought like when I got clean, I thought for sure that it was
just going to be this one thing. I had done this wonderful thing for myself
and my family and everything was just going to be great. It’s like painting the house
and once you’re done, that’s it. And then you just kind of
move on with your life. Absolutely. And not to
say the victory though. And that’s two very
important to mention here, that the victory is there. The victory does come.
So not to forget that. So it’s not, so you’re not saying
that as to be as like, Hey, it’s daunting and it’s going
to be a struggle that you
have for the rest of your life. You’re just saying
that it’s something that
you’re going to even want to continue to journey down and
continue to invest your time in. Absolutely. Taking the time to really, uh, allow life to unfold and sitting
in it wherever you’re at. If you’re having rough moments, this too shall pass when
you’re having good moments. This too shall pass. We need
to keep ourselves protected. Yeah. And do you think that that was
something kind of back to that era, that time in your life where you’re
kept relapsing? Is that something that, that sets you up for that like kind of
getting complacent in the good and then not building that, that, that good place or that mental
strength or whatever it was, discharging that stress and then you
kinda got caught off guard and you feel like that was part of the cycle? Absolutely. Absolutely. I
wasn’t even guarding myself. I was just living in the moment. There was no sort of planning
just lollygagging through life. Like I’ll just take every day as it
comes and if that can be important. It’s also important to have
a safety guards around us. I know, I know that when I do certain things I
might be triggered if I go into a grocery store and they’re certain I’m
in a certain neighborhood, maybe I might run into someone or whatnot. So safety guarding against that and
shifting or pivoting into another area, go to another neighborhood if
it really truly is a problem. Protecting yourself. Those sorts of, well especially in a, and I think you know a huge thing for me
and a huge thing I’ll tell other people is that awareness piece, like having that awareness to like someday
a particular trigger might not really bother you. Another day when you’re more
stressed out, you’re more exhausted, you’ve got 10 extra things on
your plate. That same trigger, that same event could push you over the
edge or could be too much for you at that time. So to your point, like you
know, if you are extra stressed out, if you are extra worn down then
recognize yeah, I’m going to go to the, I’m going to go to a different place
cause I don’t want a chance to put myself in that, in that environment.
But it comes back to awareness. Absolutely. Self-awareness,
super important. And one of the things that I do speak
to my client base about is halt. What is it is we’re stopping in in
sometimes the beginning of recovery. It could mean taking a, an alarm clock or a watch
and every hour doing a check, um, and asking yourself,
uh, am I hungry? Halt. H a L T am I hungry? Am I angry? Am I tired or am I lonely? So like the lonely piece I think is
important for weekends because people, uh, you know, on a Friday night they
want to go hang out with their friends. But if they have a strong tendency towards
relapse or being with old people that could cause relapse, these are
the sorts of things that’s are, that’s important to just stop my hungry, my tired and my angry. And my lonely. So that’s another really awesome
tip that with my people. Yep. Yeah. So I know that you’ve taken a lot of what
you’ve learned in your journey and it really inspired you to help other
people who have faced similar struggles. What was that? What was that big inspiration or when was
it that you decided that you wanted to kind of focus on that? Yeah, so, uh, I didn’t feel confident at first
because I didn’t really trust myself. I didn’t, I’ve had, uh,
friends and family say, you’re so good working with
people, you ought to, you know, have your own practice. And it was a
justice last year and like my ninth, 10th year that I finally made the
choice that, okay, I’ve had enough time. My program is proven, it’s solid, we’re good to go. We can
teach other people my methods. Yeah. Very cool. And how’s
that journey been so far? It’s been quite a learning
journey. It’s been really good. Uh, people have taken to, to the work that
I do with them and uh, people are, are doing well. Yeah. Well, awesome.
Well, thank you so much. I know you said a lot of things there
that are tremendous value and I’m sure that you’ll planted some seeds and some
I just kind of right at the right time when they need to hear it.
So thank you for your time. For anybody that’s listening in, if you want to go find some more of
this stuff that Victoria Wilson does, I want to make sure I threw
your whole name in there. I’ll tag it of course in the post,
but you go to rehabilitation station, you can search for that Facebook group
and you can go and you kind of connect with her there and learn a little bit
more about her and her journey and the inspiration that she has to help
other people. Any parting shots? Any last thing you want to
say before we, uh, end this? Uh, if you have a need, give
me, give me a call. Shout out. All right, well thank you very much.
Appreciate you. Thanks for having me. Absolutely. Be well.

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